City Council to Consider Hunt Library Policy Statement

061620 ADM Hunt Branch Library Council Policy Statement

On June 15 the Fullerton City Council will consider a policy statement concerning the Hunt Library. The statement, reproduced below, begins with the very important statement that the Hunt should remain a property of the city and be utilized for the benefit of the public. Save the Hunt was founded to see a policy like this supported by the city and put into effect.

The Goals and Visions include recognition of the structure’s style and historical importance. This is a critical position for the council to adopt to avoid inappropriate restoration and/or additional structures on the site that might compromise this unique structure and campus. It could only be strengthened by adding that no additional structures should be built near the Hunt.

One might also wish for the council to support a policy of the Library Board of Trustees having some role in overseeing the site and activities there.

The City Council meeting will be held in the City Hall Council Chambers, 303 W. Commonwealth Ave., CA 92832, 303 W. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, Ca, 93832. Options for public participation can be found below:

“PUBLIC PARTICIPATION: Pursuant to Executive Order N-29-20 and given the current health concerns, members of the public can access meetings streamed live online at https://fullerton.legistar.com, on Spectrum Cable Channel 3 and AT&T U-Verse Channel 99. The City Council Chamber will have limited seating available on a first- come, first-served basis for members of the public to attend the meeting in person. All persons visiting City facilities shall wear face masks and observe social distancing protocols.

In lieu of public attendance, members of the public can submit comments electronically for City Council consideration by clicking on the eComment link accompanying the agenda posted online at https://fullerton.legistar.com until the close of the public comment period for the item.

Alternatively, the public can send correspondence to the City Council regarding agenda items by emailing council@cityoffullerton.com with the subject line “CITY COUNCIL MEETING CORRESPONDENCE – ITEM #” (insert the item number relevant to your comment) or “CITY COUNCIL MEETING CORRESPONDENCE NON-AGENDA ITEM”. Staff will forward correspondence received to City Council. All correspondence received becomes part of the official record of the meeting and posted online with the supplemental materials for that meeting. Contact the City Clerk’s Office at cityclerksoffice@cityoffullerton.com or (714)-738-6350 with any questions.

 

 

 

Quirk-Silva Celebrates City Council Vote on Hunt Library

Quirk-Silva Hunt Press Release

On June 3 The office of Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva issued the following press release about the selection of ArtsOC/Heritage Future as the applicants selected by the Fullerton City Council to provide programming and oversee needed renovations to the historic structure. Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva’s securing of $ 2.5 million in state funding is a crucial element in the revival of the Hunt.

City of Fullerton Unanimously Votes to Renovate Hunt Branch Library

Sacramento, CAAssemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva’s $2.5 million 2019 budget request that was approved and allocated to the City of Fullerton will be utilized for the renovations of the Hunt Branch Library.  The Fullerton City Council unanimously approved the selection panel’s recommendation for the Arts Orange County and Heritage Future.

“I am very proud to have worked with the state to secure $2.5 million for a future renovated Hunt Branch Library.  As a classroom teacher, and former City Council Member, I have always prioritized community spaces, literacy, and the arts.  I cannot wait to see the Hunt Library open for the public again,” said Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva.

The Hunt Branch Library was designated as a local landmark by the Fullerton City Council in November 2018.  The designation is meant both to recognize significant structures in the city and to prevent them from being inappropriately remodeled or destroyed. The Hunt Branch Library was donated to the City of Fullerton by Norton Simon’s Hunt Foods Foundationin 1962.  The building received this designation because of its significant style and outstanding design, as well as the importance and influence of its architect, William Pereira.

Arts Orange County’s experience as a non-profit arts advocacy group founded twenty years ago, at a time when such an organization was lacking in Orange County, has established themselves as a contributor to major and most minor arts organizations.  Their work with many members of the group that continue to advocate for arts funding and support helps them lead the way for this project.  Furthermore, they provide organizational and other services to our community which are vital for this project.

“Having this non-profit organization along with Heritage Future that is dedicated to community building, and providing a diverse neighborhood with creative and cultural opportunities for everyone in the City of Fullerton, I am confident that they will put the $2.5 million in California State Budget Funding to good use in this project,” said Assemblywoman Quirk-Silva.

After years of discussions as to whether the facility should be renovated, the City Council has made a clear direction to the staff and community for how the site could be used and will move forward with the renovation project.

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Community Efforts Lead to Beginning of New Era for Hunt Library

Kevin Staniec and Rick Stein address the Fullerton City Council

 

The Fullerton City Council unanimously approved the applicant recommended by a review panel to begin engagement with the city about providing programming and renovations to the Hunt Branch Library. A joint proposal by Heritage Future and ArtsOC received the support of all five members of the council, but not before at least two other applicants complained about what they perceived as an opaque selection process. Several speakers representing Access California, who scored third of eight applicants, asked the council to continue the decision to a future meeting. Council member Jesus Silva countered with a concern that the $ 2.5 million state grant secured by Assemlbywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva (his wife) for restoration and upgrades to the facility might not be available for an indefinite period, and urged a timely decision by the council.

Council member Ahmad Zahra suggested that the motion to approve Heritage Future/ArtsOC should include a backup selection of runners up, but that effort was ultimately sidelined. Zahra eventually joined the other four members in voting in favor of the winning application without such a provision.

The city will now, according to the agenda report for the June 2 meeting, “begin work with the selected provider to finalize both physical improvements needed at the site in order to utilize a $2.5 million State appropriation secured by Assemblywoman Sharon Quirk-Silva and create a partnership agreement outlining the terms of operations and services for the future of providing the priorities as outlined by the Hunt Branch Library Ad Hoc Committee. The agreement will be brought back to the City Council for approval.”

Plans for renovations of the building and grounds merit close scrutiny. We will be following the process to see what the applicant and city have in mind, and work, where necessary, to ensure that any physical work on the building is appropriately conceived and executed.

The council’s approval of a partner to present new programming the facility marks a milestone in the efforts to Save the Hunt, once viewed as a relic whose best use to the city would be to sell it off for a short term financial gain. Instead, the building and site have been removed from the city’s list of surplus properties and have received some measure of historical recognition and protection, a public committee has recommended that the facility remain in public hands for the purpose of arts and literary programming, a partner selected to do just that, and $ 2.5 million secured to address the Hunt’s infrastructural needs. The story continues to unfold, but without the support of community members like yourself, none of these goals could have been achieved.

THIS IS IT! Final Hunt Library Decision This Tuesday, June 2!

Fullerton City Council Meeting: Tuesday, June 2, 6:30pm

Agenda Item # 10 (3rd major item to be heard)

We need your help Tuesday to let the council know if you agree with the recommendation to engage the winning respondent to the Hunt Request for Proposal (see below for this week’s Observer article). Please also ask that the Library Board of Trustees be allowed to oversee the new project, as the $2.5 million rehabilitation grant requires some type of library connection. 

As you know, the mission of Save The Hunt is to keep the Hunt Branch Library in the public realm for community use. We wanted to see something as close to a library use as possible, and are especially concerned that the building itself be preserved without undue additional or insensitive construction. 

In-person attendance is now allowed again at City Hall; social distancing and face covering required. Attendee overflow is next door in the Library Conference Room. 

You can also call (1), e-mail (2), and/or e-comment (3) the councilmembers:

(1)    (714) 738-6311

(2)    council@cityoffullerton.com

(3)    https://fullerton.legistar.com (click “eComment” on right)

For more info: Hunt@SaveTheHunt.com

  or call 714-729-3019

City Releases Request for Proposals for use of Hunt Library

The City of Fullerton has released a Request for Proposals intended to solicit interest in “programming and operations” at the historic Hunt Branch Library. Submission are due no later than 5:00 p.m., Thursday, January 23rd, 2020 UPDATE: The city has extended the deadline for receipt of proposals to February 24. Deliver submissions to the City Clerk, City of Fullerton, 303 W. Commonwealth Avenue, Fullerton, California, 92832.

According to the cover of the RFP, the city is looking for a partner to provide “cultural and/or entrepreneurial type services and programming”

According to the RFP, which can be found HERE,:

“Qualified partnership teams must have significant experience and demonstrated ability to develop successful and high quality literacy, educational, cultural and/or entrepreneurial programs. Qualified teams will have experience collaborating with various organizations and managing educational programs and services. The selected partner(s) will be responsible for programming and operations at the Hunt Library building.

The City has secured $2.5 million in funding to assist in the renovation of the interior library building and is prepared to work with the selected partner(s) to create a welcoming and efficient space for literacy, cultural and event programming.”

The timetable described in the RFP is as follows:

“Phase I (February) – Focuses on proposer(s) qualifications, experience, and other factors; and
Phase II (March – April) – Respondent(s) who meet qualifications will be invited for interviews.

Phase III (May) – Finalize recommendation to the City Council.”

City Council Study Session on Hunt Library May 7, 5:30 p.m.

At 5:30 p.m., May 7, the Fullerton City Council will hold a Study Session about the Hunt Library in the council chambers located at 303 W. Commonwealth Ave. The purpose of the session is to discuss “identifying and prioritizing future potential uses of the Hunt Branch Library as recommended by the Library Ad Hoc Committee.”

The full agenda report can be found at this link: https://fullerton.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=3936489&GUID=0CB906F8-716A-4A3B-B07B-EDE3C7FB972E

The page includes a copy of the Library Ad Hoc Committee’s report to the Fullerton City Council, as well as a letter from the Library Board of Trustees, who wrote that “We endorse the goals presented by the Library Ad Hoc Committee, and we agree with their first priorities emphasizing a broad spectrum of literacy programs. This priority would include Art, Culture, Museum Uses, Events, Activities and Classes which would benefit the larger Fullerton community.”

On February 1 of this year the council directed city staff to schedule the study session in order to develop a Request for Proposals (RFP) to be issued by the city. Non-profits or other outside agencies could respond to the RFP with proposals to operate on the site, providing programming in accordance with list of prioritized uses identified by the Library Ad Hoc Committee (literary, arts and culture, events, classes, etc.).

The staff report for May 7 recommends developing an RFP to solicit partner organizations to not only provide compatible programming in accordance with those suggested by the Ad Hoc Committee, but also one that would obtain “grants and other funding for capital and other improvements to the building and grounds to modernize its technology ability, make it accessibility compliant, and to repair and / or replace necessary plumbing, electrical and mechanical systems,” suggesting that the city is not prepared to make these investments.

The agenda report anticipates considering responses to an issued RFP sometime before the end of this year.

The study session represents a valuable opportunity for supporters to attend and voice their support for keeping the Hunt Library in the public realm.

California Historical Resources Commission Approves Landmark Nomination for Hunt Center and Library

The interior of the Hunt Library, seen in a report presented to the California Historical Resources Commission on February 1.

The California Historical Resources Commission has approved the California Register landmark nomination for the 1962 Hunt Center and Library. The landmark nomination was one of four nominated properties on the consent calendar of the Commission’s February 1 meeting agenda. The report accompanying the nomination noted that the “district retains a high degree of historic integrity.”

The Hunt Center includes the Hunt office building, the designed landscape, a platform with metal canopy, six modernist benches, and six hexagonal planters. The Hunt Office Building was characterized as exhibiting “all the striking elements of the international style,” including its “rectilinear form and steel structure, glass panels, and repeated modular panels.” The Hunt Office Building and its surrounding grounds are owned by Grace Ministries International, who added a large unrelated structure to the property after purchasing it was Hunt Wesson, Inc. Grace Ministries currently leases the Hunt Library from its owner, the City of Fullerton.

The Hunt Library, conceived as a companion to the Hunt Office Building in style, was described as embodying all the features of a small branch library of the period, designed in the international style, one seldom otherwise used in Fullerton. The nomination also cited the importance of the Hunt Library having been designed by word famous architect William Pereira and commissioned by Norton Simon, a self-made industrialist and art collector.

The nomination was by Fullerton Heritage, who authored an extensive report found on this site.

A view of part of the Hunt Center and Library campus, showing the pavilion and library. Photo by world famous architectural photographer Julius Shulman.



Proposed Hunt Library Local Landmark Designation on City Council Agenda Nov. 20

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On the Fullerton City Council agenda, Tuesday, November 20 is the proposed designation of the Hunt Branch Library as a Fullerton Local Landmark. As noted in the staff report:

“The Planning Commission reviewed the application at a noticed public hearing held on October 24, 2018. Following a presentation from staff, remarks by Fullerton Heritage as the project applicant and public comments, the six members of the Planning Commission present (Pendergraft absent) unanimously recommended approval for designation of the property as a Local Historical Landmark.”

Readers are encouraged the attend the meeting, to be held at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, to urge the council to follow the Planning Commission’s recommendation to designate the property as a Local Landmark.

The applications by Fullerton Heritage for both Local Landmark status and inclusion on the National Registry of Historic Places can be found on this site at this link: https://savethehunt.com/fullerton-heritages-local-landmark-and-national-register-applications/

Hunt Library Before Landmarks Commission Wednesday, October 24

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The Hunt Branch Library is on the agenda of the Planning Commission, who also act as Fullerton’s Landmarks Commission Wednesday evening, October 24 at City Hall. The meeting will take place in the City Council chambers, 303 West Commonwealth Avenue, beginning at 7:00 p.m. It is the third item on the Commission’s agenda.

Local preservationist group Fullerton Heritage, have written an extraordinarily complete application found at this link on this website:

https://wordpress.com/post/savethehunt.com/229

For reference, the Fullerton Municipal Code is cited in the staff report for the item. It reads, in part:

15.48.060.  Criteria for designation.

   A.   In considering a request for a “Historical Landmark” designation, the following criteria shall be used in determining eligibility:
      1.   Character, interest or value as part of the heritage of the city.
      2.   Location as a site of a historic event.
      3.   Identification with a person or persons or groups who significantly contributed to the culture and development of the city.
      4.   Exemplification of a particular architectural style or way of life important to the city.
      5.   Exemplification of the best remaining architectural types in an area.
      6.   Identification as the work of a person or persons whose work has influenced the heritage of the city, the state of California or the United States.
      7.   Embodiment of elements of outstanding attention to architectural design, detail, materials, or craftsmanship.
      8.   Relationship to other landmarks, where the preservation of one has a bearing on the preservation of another.
      9.   A unique location or singular physical characteristic representing an established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhood.
      10.   Integrity as a natural environment that strongly contributes to the well being of the people of the city.
   B.   In considering a request for a “Landmark District” designation, support of the designation should be demonstrated by a substantial majority of the property owners within the boundary of the proposed district. 
(Ord. 2982, 2001).
The Hunt Branch Library, designed by a world famous architect who had a profound impact on the development of California in the last century, commissioned by an industrialist/philanthropist whose business was a significant employer in our city for over half a century, is a strong candidate for Landmark status. Please be sure to attend the meeting to support protection for this irreplaceable and unique structure Wednesday  night.

Final Library Ad Hoc Committee Meeting Wednesday, Oct. 10, 5:30 p.m. the Muckenthaler Cultural Center

Agenda-25A

The Library Ad-Hoc Committee will have its fourth and last meeting on Wednesday, October 10, , 1201 W. Malvern Ave. (park in the main lot at the top of the hill).  The Committee is expected to draft a recommendation to the City Council regarding the possible uses for the Hunt Library. The agenda for the meeting can be found at this link: October 10 Library Ad Hoc Agenda

The Landmarks Commission hearing for the Hunt Library, that we originally expected for the same evening, has been postponed, so you can attend the Ad-Hoc at the Muckenthaler instead. We will alert you when the Landmark hearing is eventually scheduled.

Agenda-25Map